Summer Book Club 2018 – Week Four (Chapter 4)

In Summer Book Club 2018 by BIC

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A) Before You Read


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B) READ: Chapter 4


C) Questions


  • Question 1

    Three landmark court cases in 1823, 1831 and 1832 in the USA and then the implementation of the Indian Act in Canada, reduced Native people in both countries, “to the status of children and were declared wards of the state….Indians in all of North America were property….we were more like furniture.” p .82

    What does King’s use of these metaphors cause you to feel or think? How was the Indian Act paternalistic and how has it resulted in dependency?

  • Question 2

    King writes (p.88) that the “removal” and “relocation” of Native nations, “broke the back of communities.” Native people believe the land was created by God and, hence, is sacred, while Western cultures tend to view land as a natural resource or commodity. Treaties, and government policies “appropriated” or stole Native lands.

    How does King describe how the loss of land has affected Native people?

  • Question 3

    In the book, King laments, “More than one scholar has argued that treaties were never meant to be long-standing agreements, that they were expediencies of the moment. Indians were dying… and in 50 or 100 years, Native people would be gone….In the meantime, however, the combination of military action, treaties and the myth of Native extinction was not working fast enough to keep pace with the demand for space….Indians were, through no fault of their own, still in the way. Still inconvenient.” p. 84-85

      a) According to King, what was the rationale of non-Native people in signing treaties?

      b) How was this different than Native perspectives?

  • Question 4

    What can we learn from a Native perspective that helps address some of the ills/sins of western culture?


D) Comment on the Facebook Page

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E) Prayer

The Lord’s Prayer – Matthew 6: 9-13

O Great Father, the one who lives above us all, we honour your name as sacred and holy. 
Bring your Good Road to us, where beauty of your ways in the world above is reflected in the earth below.
Provide for us day by day – the elk, the buffalo, and the salmon; the corn, the squash and the wild rice; all the things we need each day.
Release us from the things we have done wrong, in the same way we release others for the things done wrong to us.
Guide us away from the things that tempt us to stray from your Good Road, and set us free from the evil one and his worthless ways.

– First Nations Version 2017